Finding Lillie in the 1930 census

My great-grandmother Lillie CHAMBERS became a widow when her husband John Leland “Lee” MILLER died in 1916 in Paulina, Crook County, Oregon. Her oldest son was 20 and took over running the general store in the tiny town of Paulina.

Her two other sons were 16 and 8 in 1916. She came to Oregon in the 1890’s to teach school and that’s what she did until she married my great-grandfather. After his death she started teaching again and taught in various schools throughout Crook County.

I found Lillie and her two younger sons in the 1920 census still living in Paulina (listed as the Beaver Precinct in the Census¹):

1920 Census
Lillie Miller and her two sons–Eugene and Joe–listed at the bottom. She’s 48 years old, widowed and teaching public school

If you look at the top of the census form Lyle & May Miller are listed. Arthur Lyle MILLER was Lillie’s oldest son. Lyle and May were my grandparents. His occupation is “Retail Merchant–Groceries” and May’s occupation is “Postmistress–Government.” Lyle and May got married in 1918.

I searched for Lillie MILLER in the 1930 census records, but she wasn’t living in Paulina. I knew she didn’t die until the 1950’s and that she stayed in Crook County, Oregon and taught in various schools, but I was unable to find her.

However, one day when I was searching for my grandmother’s brothers and sisters to add to my family tree I found one of my grandmother’s brothers in the 1930 census² (see below) and when I looked down the page there was Lillie! She was boarding in someone’s home and still teaching school. She was still in Crook County, but was living in the Maury area of Crook County.

1930 Census, Maury, Crook, Oregon
Lillie Miller is near the bottom of this page. Listed as a boarder with the Morris family, 59 years old, widowed, teaching public school

The household above the Morris family shows James and Viola McCULLOUGH and their daughter Maxine. James was my Grandma May’s brother.

Finding Lillie in this census record was just chance on my part, but it did remind me to check the rest of the census page to see if there are other people I recognize on the page. And I have found other census records which show two or more families which are ancestors. For example, I found a census record in the 1800’s  which showed two families living next door to each other and I realized that a son and daughter from each family married a few years later. That’s always nice to find…and a good reminder to keep my eyes open!

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Source Info:

¹Year: 1920; Census Place: Beaver, Crook, Oregon; Roll: T625_1491; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 28; Image: 475.

²Year: 1930; Census Place: Maury, Crook, Oregon; Roll: 1939; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 0015; Image: 465.0; FHL microfilm: 2341673.

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Following Enos and Ellis through the years

We all have names of family which repeat over and over again through the years. I have lots of those names in my different family lines. And they can make figuring out who is who a nightmare. In my MILLER family, for example, the furthest I have traced is to a John MILLER, born in 1753 and his daughter Catherine MILLER (who married a man apparently unrelated named John MILLER)! There are lots of John MILLERs in this family line, but I don’t really know if the names are from earlier family members or just because John is a familiar and popular name.

However, I have traced one line back to Thomas ELLIS, born 1683 in Wales who had a son named Enos Ellis. After that I’ve found the names Enos and Ellis given to many family members for almost 200 years. These names are not the usual names given to sons so I think I can say that these names were passed down through the generations–even if they didn’t know exactly where the names came from.

Enos Ellis–6th great-grandfather, born 1725; died 1783

Ellis Ellis–6th great-uncle, born 1760; died 1808

Ellis Pickering–1st cousin 6x removed, born 1780

Enos Pickering–1st cousin 6x removed, born 1783

Enos Ellis Pickering–4th great-grandfather, born 1779; died 1851

Enos Ellis Williams–3rd great-uncle, born 1833; died 1915

Eugene Ellis Williams–1st cousin 3x removed, born 1871; died 1946

Thomas Enos McCullough–great-uncle, born 1907; died 1984

Do you have any unusual recurring names in your families? Do you think I can plausibly say that these names were passed through my family?

My family DNA results, part 1

My kids bought me a DNA test from Ancestry for my birthday this year. I’ve gotten the results back and it’s all so interesting–though I am still trying to understand it all! I got my brother to do his DNA, too, so I thought I would write a series of articles about what I think I’ve learned. This will help me figure things out in my own mind and I hope if I get things wrong maybe someone will comment and help me.

My ethnicity estimates are:
  • 68% Scandinavian
  • 15% Great Britain
  • 11 % Europe West

With the following low confidence areas:

  • 4% Ireland
  • ≤ 1% Europe East
  • ≤ 1% Iberian Peninsula

What I know  about my ethnicity from my genealogy:

  • My VALLEY and JOHNSON families came from Norway and Sweden.
  • The WINTERS and HARMS families came from Germany.
  • My great-grandmother Lillie CHAMBERS thought her family came from Ireland.
  • The story I’ve read is that my MILLER family came from Germany before the Revolutionary War.
  • We think the McCULLOUGH family came from Scotland.
  • There are several family lines which were in the United States in the 1700’s and we don’t know for sure where they came from and in some cases I’m not confident putting them into my family tree since I don’t have evidence they belong there. The PICKERING family probably came from Great Britain.

As anyone can see from the above information I haven’t really taken my genealogy across the pond. Based on what I am quite sure about I’m surprised I didn’t show up with more Irish and Western Europe (German) ethnicity. And I was surprised I show up with 11% Great Britain.

From what I have read these ethnicity estimates are just that: estimates. Also right above the Ethnicity Estimate on Ancestry it says “Thousands of years ago” so that seems to indicate this is not necessarily something that shows up in my genealogy.

My brother’s ethnicity results:
  • 63% Scandinavian
  • 23 % Europe West
  • 10 % Ireland

With the following low confidence areas:

  • 2% Europe East
  • ≤ 1% Iberian Peninsula
  • 0% Great Britain

Since my paternal grandparents were 100% Scandinavian and their families were probably in Norway and Sweden for a long time the fact that both my brother and I are so high with our Scandinavian ethnicity makes sense to me. He shows a bit more Europe West than I do (23% as opposed to my 11%) and quite a bit more Ireland than me (10% versus 4%). I’m surprised he shows 0% Great Britain and I show 15% Great Britain.

I do need to remember these are “estimates from thousands of years ago!” And I have read that the Vikings traveled into Germany and, of course, Great Britain and Ireland–and I’m sure they left some DNA behind! They were even into Russia and Eastern Europe. The ≤ 1% Iberian Peninsula both my brother and I show is surprising though I don’t think it’s very significant.

Well, I hope I haven’t made a bunch of incorrect assumptions based on my ethnicity estimates. I think the biggest takeaway for me is that the ethnicity estimates might offer a hint, but I shouldn’t use these estimates to say “I have Irish ethnicity” unless I have genealogy to back it up.

To anyone who has more experience with DNA  can you tell me if I’m on the right path with this?