Longevity–52 Ancestors, Week 3

I am participating in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. The topic this week is “Longevity.”

I’m talking about my grandmother and her McCullough brothers and sisters this week. (I do have other ancestors than my grandmother and her family and I will talk about them one of these days! They are just the ones who come to mind so far when I see these topics.)

My grandmother had three brothers and six sisters and the majority of them lived 80 or more years. My grandmother (May McCullough) and one of her sisters (Nellie Christina McCullough) were 101 and 102 before they died in 1993. A brother (James Andrew McCullough) and sister (Edna L. McCullough) were 99 and 96 when they died. Two sisters were over 80. This group of brothers and sisters had Longevity!

May-McCullough-Miller
May McCullough Miller signing the book she wrote (taken about 1974 when she was 82 years old)

The above picture of my grandmother shows her signing Golden Memories of the Paulina Area she wrote about the Paulina, Oregon area where she spent a lot of her life helping my grandfather run the general store and running the post office for the little town. She got herself a typewriter and typed the book over several years. She paid to have the book published, but I think the book is amazing!

Her family were all used to working hard. Their father sent them from their home near John Day, Oregon when they were young to go out and work. My grandmother took care of young children, helped one of her sisters cook at a ranch and worked in the house and general store and then married a son in the family. She told me about a baby she took care of whose mother had tuberculosis and was kept away from her baby. However, the mother eventually died as did the baby. I’m amazed my grandmother didn’t get tuberculosis.

My grandmother once told me she did exercises every day. She continued to ride horseback into her 70’s and, of course, cooked and cleaned every day for most of her life. She broke her hip when she was 90 and when she left the hospital she said “Oh, I’ll go into a nursing home now.” That lasted about two hours before she called her son and said, “Please come and pick me up!”

She continued to live by herself in a trailer on my aunt and uncle’s ranch until she died. In the last five or six years of her life she was mostly in a wheel chair and had a woman who came in to help her get up in the morning, cook meals for her and help her get to bed. Everyone on the ranch would stop in and visit at various times during the day and friends and relatives came by, but mostly she managed by herself. My cousins and I used to say she was too ornery to die! She wasn’t always the easiest person to be around and I do think that helped her stay alive.

Who in your family has shown longevity? Was it because they lived to an old age or longevity in a job or some other type of longevity?

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